Johns Hopkins experts give their top tips for a safe Thanksgiving

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Johns Hopkins experts give their top tips for a safe Thanksgiving

Dr. Amesh Adalja and Professor Keri N. Althoff from the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University lay out different options for staying safe this week, even if travel is involved (though not advised). They share details regarding multiple vaccines filing for FDA Emergency Use Authorization and explain why a vaccine isn’t a silver bullet solution. 

Adalja and Althoff share helpful ideas for mitigating risk like going for a Thanksgiving walk, gathering just for dessert, keeping people from different households within existing ‘pods’ after gathering, opening windows for ventilation despite cold weather, and even eating underneath a face shield. As Dr. Adalja says, “you just have to be creative and think about the virus being at the table with you and not allowing it to have access to your friends and family.” 

To get more pandemic updates and insights from Johns Hopkins University, check out the Public Health On Call podcast.

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Dr. Amesh Adalja and Professor Keri N. Althoff from the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University lay out different options for staying safe this week, even if travel is involved (though not advised). They share details regarding multiple vaccines filing for FDA Emergency Use Authorization and explain why a vaccine isn’t a silver bullet solution. 

Adalja and Althoff share helpful ideas for mitigating risk like going for a Thanksgiving walk, gathering just for dessert, keeping people from different households within existing ‘pods’ after gathering, opening windows for ventilation despite cold weather, and even eating underneath a face shield. As Dr. Adalja says, “you just have to be creative and think about the virus being at the table with you and not allowing it to have access to your friends and family.” 

To get more pandemic updates and insights from Johns Hopkins University, check out the Public Health On Call podcast.

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