Self-Evaluation: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) - Locally Advanced

ASCO Education Podcast

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Self-Evaluation: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) - Locally Advanced

ASCO Education Podcast

TRANSCRIPT

Welcome to the Self-Evaluation episode of the ASCO University weekly podcast. My name is Apar Kishor Ganti, and I'm the Associate Director for Clinical Research and the co-leader of the Thoracic Oncology Service at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Fred and Pamela Buffett Cancer Center.

Today, we feature a self-evaluation question on locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. I will begin by reading the question stem. A 58-year-old man with a 50-pack year history of smoking presents to your clinic with worsening cough and shortness of breath. His comorbidities include irritable bowel syndrome and coronary artery disease.

A CT scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis reveal a two-centimeter right lower lobe mass with no evidence of lymphadenopathy in the chest. A positron emission tomography scan confirms a hypermetabolic right lower lobe mass and mildly avid mediastinal nodes. An MRI of the brain was performed and was negative.

A biopsy of the right lower lobe mass was positive for squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. The patient was taken for a mediastinal lymph node evaluation by a thoracic surgeon. Additional biopsies of multiple lymph nodes were taken. Pulmonary function tests revealed that a right lower lobectomy would be feasible if warranted.

Which of the following would lead you to recommend definitive chemoradiation rather than surgery as the most appropriate treatment for this patient? The answer choices are, A, metastatic squamous cell carcinoma identified in a left hilar lymph node, B, metastatic squamous cell carcinoma identified in a right hilar lymph node, C, the absence of squamous cell carcinoma in a left paratracheal lymph node, and D, the absence of squamous cell carcinoma in a right hilar lymph node?

[MUSIC PLAYING]

The correct answer to this question is A, metastatic squamous cell carcinoma identified in a left hilar lymph node. In the eighth edition of the AJCC TNM classification system, this tumor would be classified as T1B.

The presence of cancer in a contralateral hilar lymph node represents N3 disease and thus, stage 3B. Surgery is not recommended in this setting, and definitive chemoradiation is considered standard of care.

What about the other choices? Involvement of an ipsilateral hilar node would only represent N1 and stage 2B disease, for which a right lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection are appropriate.

The absence of involvement of the left paratracheal node would confirm the absence of N3 disease, while the absence of involvement of the right hilar node would confirm the absence of N1 disease. In both these scenarios, the patient would be considered resectable if other lymph node stations are not involved.

Thank you for listening to this week's episode of the ASCO University weekly podcast. For more information on lung cancers, including important release for self-evaluation, visit the comprehensive E-Learning Center at university.asco.org. Thank you.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.

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TRANSCRIPT

Welcome to the Self-Evaluation episode of the ASCO University weekly podcast. My name is Apar Kishor Ganti, and I'm the Associate Director for Clinical Research and the co-leader of the Thoracic Oncology Service at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Fred and Pamela Buffett Cancer Center.

Today, we feature a self-evaluation question on locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. I will begin by reading the question stem. A 58-year-old man with a 50-pack year history of smoking presents to your clinic with worsening cough and shortness of breath. His comorbidities include irritable bowel syndrome and coronary artery disease.

A CT scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis reveal a two-centimeter right lower lobe mass with no evidence of lymphadenopathy in the chest. A positron emission tomography scan confirms a hypermetabolic right lower lobe mass and mildly avid mediastinal nodes. An MRI of the brain was performed and was negative.

A biopsy of the right lower lobe mass was positive for squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. The patient was taken for a mediastinal lymph node evaluation by a thoracic surgeon. Additional biopsies of multiple lymph nodes were taken. Pulmonary function tests revealed that a right lower lobectomy would be feasible if warranted.

Which of the following would lead you to recommend definitive chemoradiation rather than surgery as the most appropriate treatment for this patient? The answer choices are, A, metastatic squamous cell carcinoma identified in a left hilar lymph node, B, metastatic squamous cell carcinoma identified in a right hilar lymph node, C, the absence of squamous cell carcinoma in a left paratracheal lymph node, and D, the absence of squamous cell carcinoma in a right hilar lymph node?

[MUSIC PLAYING]

The correct answer to this question is A, metastatic squamous cell carcinoma identified in a left hilar lymph node. In the eighth edition of the AJCC TNM classification system, this tumor would be classified as T1B.

The presence of cancer in a contralateral hilar lymph node represents N3 disease and thus, stage 3B. Surgery is not recommended in this setting, and definitive chemoradiation is considered standard of care.

What about the other choices? Involvement of an ipsilateral hilar node would only represent N1 and stage 2B disease, for which a right lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection are appropriate.

The absence of involvement of the left paratracheal node would confirm the absence of N3 disease, while the absence of involvement of the right hilar node would confirm the absence of N1 disease. In both these scenarios, the patient would be considered resectable if other lymph node stations are not involved.

Thank you for listening to this week's episode of the ASCO University weekly podcast. For more information on lung cancers, including important release for self-evaluation, visit the comprehensive E-Learning Center at university.asco.org. Thank you.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.

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