ASCO Guideline: Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

ASCO Education Podcast

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ASCO Guideline: Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

ASCO Education Podcast

TRANSCRIPT

[MUSIC PLAYING]

Welcome to the ASCO Guidelines episode of the ASCO University weekly podcast. My name is Alexander Drilon, and I'm the clinical director of the early drug development service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and editorial board member for ASCO University.

Today we feature an ASCO guideline published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The episode you are about to hear was originally aired on the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. The ASCO Guidelines podcast series features interviews with panelists of recently published ASCO clinical practice guidelines products, highlighting recommendations and noteworthy qualifying statements made by the expert panel.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. My name is Shannon McKernin, and today I'm interviewing Dr. Davendra Sohal from Cleveland Clinic, lead author on Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline update. Thank you for being here today, Dr. Sohal.

Thanks for having me. It's a pleasure.

So this update is focused on revising the recommendations on second line treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer. Can you tell us about the studies that informed this update?

Certainly. The first study is a paper published in Science on PD-1 inhibition and solid tumors. This study included 86 patients with mismatch repair deficient tumors, also known as microsatellite instability high tumors.

In this study, 53% of the patients had an objective response with a disease control rate of 71% across multiple histologies. The study also included eight patients with pancreatic cancer, two of whom had complete responses with a disease control rate of 75%. This is the study that informed our recommendation for checkpoint inhibitor therapy in the second line setting.

The second study is the PANCREOX trial published in JCO, which randomized patients to 5-fluorouracil or FOLFOX. With 108 patients, the primary outcome of overall survival was 9.9 months in the control 5-fluorouracil arm, and surprisingly, only 6.1 months in the FOLFOX arm. This study informed our recommendation for chemotherapy regimens in the second line setting.

And what are the new and updated recommendations for second line treatment?

For second line treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer, our first recommendation now is to consider testing for mismatch repair deficiency or microsatellite instability in patients who are candidates for checkpoint inhibitors therapy. Any standard form of testing is acceptable, whether IHC or PCR or next-gen sequencing.

Patients who have mismatch repair deficient or microsatellite instability high tumors should be treated with pembrolizumab given the excellent responses noted in the study we just discussed. For patients who do not meet these criteria for checkpoint inhibitor therapy, second line therapy with gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel can be offered to those who received FOLFIRINOX in the first line and meet other criteria for aggressive chemotherapy as detailed in the guideline.

Now, for patients who receive gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel in the first line, fluorouracil plus nanoliposomal irinotecan is the preferred second line therapy. Where nanoliposomal irinotecan is not accessible, fluorouracil plus regular irinotecan is an acceptable alternative.

As I mentioned the combination, of 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin can be considered as an option in this setting, but we have noted a qualifying statement about the PANCREOX study whose results are inconsistent with the CONCORD-3 study using the same agents as the off regimen. Given these conflicting results from different studies of 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin, the recommendation for its use in the second line setting has been softened.

Can you also give us an overview of the recommendations from the original 2016 version that the expert panel decided were still valid?

Sure. In 2016, the expert panel made recommendations which span from initial assessment through to follow up and surveillance. For every patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer, a multi-phase CT scan should be performed and baseline performance datas and comorbidities should be evaluated. Goals of care should be discussed with a multidisciplinary team, and all patients should be offered information about clinical trials.

Outside of a clinical trial, standard first line treatment options include FOLFIRINOX, gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel, or gemcitabine alone. And the full guideline provides details on which treatment is appropriate for which patients. The panel also recommended that every patient should be offered palliative care early in their treatment. These recommendations were endorsed in the update and are reprinted in totality in the bottom line box on the second page of the article.

And finally, what are some important things to note about communicating with patients with pancreatic cancer, especially in the metastatic setting?

Excellent point. It is important to communicate that participation in clinical studies is strongly encouraged. These studies could include new treatments, or supportive care measures, or collection of blood and tumor samples for further research, et cetera. While chemotherapy forms the backbone of treatment, it is only one component, and that is an important point to make.

The use of supportive care or palliative care is strongly encouraged for all patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer in order to maximize not just the quantity, but also the quality of life.

Great. Thank you for your work on this important guideline, and thank you for your time today, Dr. Sohal.

Sure. Thank you very much. I'd like to thank our panel for diligent data review and dedicated discussions and the ASCO staff for all their support in producing the update. Thank you.

And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning into the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. If you've enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast and refer the show to a colleague.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.

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TRANSCRIPT

[MUSIC PLAYING]

Welcome to the ASCO Guidelines episode of the ASCO University weekly podcast. My name is Alexander Drilon, and I'm the clinical director of the early drug development service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and editorial board member for ASCO University.

Today we feature an ASCO guideline published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The episode you are about to hear was originally aired on the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. The ASCO Guidelines podcast series features interviews with panelists of recently published ASCO clinical practice guidelines products, highlighting recommendations and noteworthy qualifying statements made by the expert panel.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. My name is Shannon McKernin, and today I'm interviewing Dr. Davendra Sohal from Cleveland Clinic, lead author on Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline update. Thank you for being here today, Dr. Sohal.

Thanks for having me. It's a pleasure.

So this update is focused on revising the recommendations on second line treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer. Can you tell us about the studies that informed this update?

Certainly. The first study is a paper published in Science on PD-1 inhibition and solid tumors. This study included 86 patients with mismatch repair deficient tumors, also known as microsatellite instability high tumors.

In this study, 53% of the patients had an objective response with a disease control rate of 71% across multiple histologies. The study also included eight patients with pancreatic cancer, two of whom had complete responses with a disease control rate of 75%. This is the study that informed our recommendation for checkpoint inhibitor therapy in the second line setting.

The second study is the PANCREOX trial published in JCO, which randomized patients to 5-fluorouracil or FOLFOX. With 108 patients, the primary outcome of overall survival was 9.9 months in the control 5-fluorouracil arm, and surprisingly, only 6.1 months in the FOLFOX arm. This study informed our recommendation for chemotherapy regimens in the second line setting.

And what are the new and updated recommendations for second line treatment?

For second line treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer, our first recommendation now is to consider testing for mismatch repair deficiency or microsatellite instability in patients who are candidates for checkpoint inhibitors therapy. Any standard form of testing is acceptable, whether IHC or PCR or next-gen sequencing.

Patients who have mismatch repair deficient or microsatellite instability high tumors should be treated with pembrolizumab given the excellent responses noted in the study we just discussed. For patients who do not meet these criteria for checkpoint inhibitor therapy, second line therapy with gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel can be offered to those who received FOLFIRINOX in the first line and meet other criteria for aggressive chemotherapy as detailed in the guideline.

Now, for patients who receive gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel in the first line, fluorouracil plus nanoliposomal irinotecan is the preferred second line therapy. Where nanoliposomal irinotecan is not accessible, fluorouracil plus regular irinotecan is an acceptable alternative.

As I mentioned the combination, of 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin can be considered as an option in this setting, but we have noted a qualifying statement about the PANCREOX study whose results are inconsistent with the CONCORD-3 study using the same agents as the off regimen. Given these conflicting results from different studies of 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin, the recommendation for its use in the second line setting has been softened.

Can you also give us an overview of the recommendations from the original 2016 version that the expert panel decided were still valid?

Sure. In 2016, the expert panel made recommendations which span from initial assessment through to follow up and surveillance. For every patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer, a multi-phase CT scan should be performed and baseline performance datas and comorbidities should be evaluated. Goals of care should be discussed with a multidisciplinary team, and all patients should be offered information about clinical trials.

Outside of a clinical trial, standard first line treatment options include FOLFIRINOX, gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel, or gemcitabine alone. And the full guideline provides details on which treatment is appropriate for which patients. The panel also recommended that every patient should be offered palliative care early in their treatment. These recommendations were endorsed in the update and are reprinted in totality in the bottom line box on the second page of the article.

And finally, what are some important things to note about communicating with patients with pancreatic cancer, especially in the metastatic setting?

Excellent point. It is important to communicate that participation in clinical studies is strongly encouraged. These studies could include new treatments, or supportive care measures, or collection of blood and tumor samples for further research, et cetera. While chemotherapy forms the backbone of treatment, it is only one component, and that is an important point to make.

The use of supportive care or palliative care is strongly encouraged for all patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer in order to maximize not just the quantity, but also the quality of life.

Great. Thank you for your work on this important guideline, and thank you for your time today, Dr. Sohal.

Sure. Thank you very much. I'd like to thank our panel for diligent data review and dedicated discussions and the ASCO staff for all their support in producing the update. Thank you.

And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning into the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. If you've enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast and refer the show to a colleague.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.

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