Self-Evaluation: Small Cell Lung Cancer

ASCO Education Podcast

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Self-Evaluation: Small Cell Lung Cancer

ASCO Education Podcast

Welcome to the self-evaluation episode of the ASCO University weekly podcast. My name is Shadia Jalal, and I am a thoracic oncologist at Indiana University. Today, we feature a self-evaluation question on the treatment of limited-stage small-cell lung cancer. And we begin by the question.

A 58-year-old man with a 40-pack-year history of cigarette smoking is found to have a spiculated 2.1-centimeter left upper lobe mass on CAT scan imaging that was performed for a suspected pneumonia. His physicians decided to immediately take him to the operating room for a wedge resection of that mass.

A preliminary analysis of the pathology from the wedge resection during the operation revealed small-cell lung cancer. A completion left upper lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection was performed. The final pathology confirmed a T1a small-cell lung cancer with negative margins and no lymph-node involvement.

Subsequent work-up included an MRI of the brain with and without gadolinium contrast and a Positron Emission Tomography, or PET scan, both of which showed no evidence of distant metastatic disease. Molecular profiling of the tumor revealed concurrent P53 and retinoblastoma mutations, as is usually seen in small-cell lung cancer.

The question is, which of the following is the most appropriate next step? A, the administration of four cycles of cisplatin and etoposide in an adjuvant fashion; B, definitive radiation to the chest with concurrent cisplatin and paclitaxel; C, four cycles of carboplatin and pemetrexed; D, definitive radiation to the chest with concurrent cyclophosphamide; E, four cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine. The correct answer is A, four cycles of cisplatin and etoposide in an adjuvant fashion.

The role of surgery in patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer is really limited to a very small number of those patients that might present with a peripheral small tumor. As is known, small-cell lung cancer is usually more of a central tumor with lymph node involvement. In a patient like this with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer and node-negative disease, adjuvant chemotherapy with a platinum doublet-- cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide-- is recommended after definitive surgery, including mediastinal lymph-node dissection.

Small-cell lung cancer is a cancer known for early hematogenous spread, and therefore adjuvant chemotherapy is indicated. CAV, or cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine, or carboplatin with pemetrexed are not appropriate treatment options in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer. In fact, pemetrexed does not have activity in small-cell lung cancer.

Concurrent chemotherapy and radiation could be recommended and considered in the presence of node-positive disease, which was not the case in this situation. And if concurrent chemotherapy and radiation is to be given, cisplatin with etoposide would be the appropriate regimen administered at the time of radiation.

Thank you for listening to this weekly podcast recording, "Small-Cell Lung Cancer."

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Welcome to the self-evaluation episode of the ASCO University weekly podcast. My name is Shadia Jalal, and I am a thoracic oncologist at Indiana University. Today, we feature a self-evaluation question on the treatment of limited-stage small-cell lung cancer. And we begin by the question.

A 58-year-old man with a 40-pack-year history of cigarette smoking is found to have a spiculated 2.1-centimeter left upper lobe mass on CAT scan imaging that was performed for a suspected pneumonia. His physicians decided to immediately take him to the operating room for a wedge resection of that mass.

A preliminary analysis of the pathology from the wedge resection during the operation revealed small-cell lung cancer. A completion left upper lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection was performed. The final pathology confirmed a T1a small-cell lung cancer with negative margins and no lymph-node involvement.

Subsequent work-up included an MRI of the brain with and without gadolinium contrast and a Positron Emission Tomography, or PET scan, both of which showed no evidence of distant metastatic disease. Molecular profiling of the tumor revealed concurrent P53 and retinoblastoma mutations, as is usually seen in small-cell lung cancer.

The question is, which of the following is the most appropriate next step? A, the administration of four cycles of cisplatin and etoposide in an adjuvant fashion; B, definitive radiation to the chest with concurrent cisplatin and paclitaxel; C, four cycles of carboplatin and pemetrexed; D, definitive radiation to the chest with concurrent cyclophosphamide; E, four cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine. The correct answer is A, four cycles of cisplatin and etoposide in an adjuvant fashion.

The role of surgery in patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer is really limited to a very small number of those patients that might present with a peripheral small tumor. As is known, small-cell lung cancer is usually more of a central tumor with lymph node involvement. In a patient like this with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer and node-negative disease, adjuvant chemotherapy with a platinum doublet-- cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide-- is recommended after definitive surgery, including mediastinal lymph-node dissection.

Small-cell lung cancer is a cancer known for early hematogenous spread, and therefore adjuvant chemotherapy is indicated. CAV, or cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine, or carboplatin with pemetrexed are not appropriate treatment options in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer. In fact, pemetrexed does not have activity in small-cell lung cancer.

Concurrent chemotherapy and radiation could be recommended and considered in the presence of node-positive disease, which was not the case in this situation. And if concurrent chemotherapy and radiation is to be given, cisplatin with etoposide would be the appropriate regimen administered at the time of radiation.

Thank you for listening to this weekly podcast recording, "Small-Cell Lung Cancer."

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